Name Amon First

Négatif sur verre collodion

This process was therefore adapted in order to extend the plates period of use following sensitization. In 1853, Marc-Antoine Gaudin introduced the use of hygroscopic substances such as sugar, honey or glycerine, which, when combined with collodion, allow a certain level of moisture to be maintained within the binder and thereby enable the plates to be prepared in advance.
In effect, collodion, which becomes impermeable when dry, prevents all solutions associated with production processes to penetrate as far as the silver salts. Processes, known as "dry collodion processes" were also developed, with the most important being Taupenot's collodion-albumen glass plate negative process of 1855. The following year, Dr. Hill Norris launched the first ready-to-use plates in England. However, dry collodion processes remained rare and mainly used for landscape photography, as their sensitivity is clearly inferior to that of wet plate collodion processes.

Visual glossary of photographic techniques © ARCP / Mairie de Paris, 2013

Images from the top:
© Bibliothèque historique de la Ville de Paris. Reproduction en lumière réfléchie, côté émulsion. ©ARCP / Mairie de Paris / Jean-Philippe Boiteux, 2014.
© Bibliothèque historique de la Ville de Paris. Reproduction en lumière transmise, côté émulsion. ©ARCP / Mairie de Paris / Jean-Philippe Boiteux, 2014.
Enlarged detail ©ARCP / Mairie de Paris / Jean-Philippe Boiteux, 2014.

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